McCalls 6201 – Navy

This was the first dress that I made this year. I made a couple of dresses years ago (including a disasterous attempt at making my older sister’s 6th form ball dress) and have decided to take it up again.

I thought this pattern looked easy and like something I’d actually wear:

I made view E (the one the model is wearing)

I decided to make it in Navy blue because I thought any mistakes that I made would be less obvious with darker material (and I really like navy!)

Here it is:

 
I made it in a 10 but it was a bit tight across my hips. I think next time I’ll have a go at combining sizes and keep the 10 for the top half and a 12 at the waist/ hips. Need to work out how to do that first though! Any tips welcome.
 
Here are some detail shots:
 
I love the pleated shoulder seams on this dress.
 
I like a scooped neckline, they are flattering on anyone.
 
All in all I was very pleased with my first piece of sewing this year!
Credits: Thank you Charlotte for taking the photos!
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7 thoughts on “McCalls 6201 – Navy”

  1. Nicely done. Mark your pattern at the 10 line at the bust and the 12 line at the waist. It helps to use a French curve, but even without that, try to have the transition between the 10 and the 12 be smooth, so it’s not a straight line, but a slightly swooping line that goes between the two spots.

    You might also want a slightly larger size in the bust, since it looks like it might pull right under the bust as well, but do not make it larger in the shoulder or neck. Make sure you use the size 10 for at least 1 inch below the armhole at the side seam, and then you can redraw the line below that to go smoothly to your size 12 at the waist.

    Another trick people use is to increase the seam allowance on the side seam, perhaps even as much as 1 inch, and then pin fit it on you. Remember to pin it loosely enough that you can move and sit! If you add seam allowance at the armhole, it changes the sleeve size as well, so if you can keep the seam allowance the same there, it helps. If you do this, it’s often a good thing to draw in your seam allowances, so you know where the original stitching lines are.

    This looks darling on you. You should definitely try it again!

    Like

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